The Vanishing – Sophia Tobin

51cdq2vnfvl-_sx328_bo1204203200_The Vanishing is another book that I’ve been waiting to come into paperback for ages. It looks exactly up my street: Victorian era, the Gothic, moors, a wealthy family, dark secrets – what’s not to love? I had made plans to purchase it on my next trip into Birmingham but I came upon it in a local Tesco, a single copy waiting on a shelf just for me, so I snatched it up.

I settled myself down on a dreary Saturday morning and started to give myself over to Miss Annaleigh Calvert, a Foundling who grew up in London and was adopted by a Painter and his family. As her life becomes more romantically entangled she is sent to Yorkshire to work as a housekeeper for a wealthy family.

For the first hundred pages or so I found the characters really hard to connect with, and for a book that had promised me so much in the way of dark secrets and lies, there wasn’t really much going on. Annaleigh is the main character and the narrative is told first person through her eyes. She’s an interesting character, though I found that I didn’t really connect with her straight away and although awful things do happen in this book, I had to force myself to care. Her upbringing as a adoptive child is quite rare in Victorian society as most children are just ‘taken in’, and it gives a good perspective of someone caught between two families, who doesn’t really fit into either.

Miss Calvert ends up in the employ of the Twentyman’s, also originally from London but retired from the city. The introduction of the looming character of Marcus Twentyman, master of the house, is probably the first time I started to feel the book turning sinister. He emanates fear and danger and at every meeting you’re really urging Annaleigh to run away from him. His sister, Hester, is probably the character I feel the most sorry for, as she is a reflection of all the women who were trapped by the ideas and morals of men.

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Bad Girls With Perfect Faces – Lynn Weingarten

61qmmo2b6uxl-_sx324_bo1204203200_Bad Girls With Perfect Faces is the second book from Lynn Weingarten. The first book, Suicide Notes From Beautiful Girls never really appealed to me but when I read the synopsis I was instantly intrigued. I picked it up on my birthday weekend and ended up reading the whole thing in a couple of hours in a waiting room.

The story follows Sasha and her best friend Xavier, who is trying to get over his toxic relationship with now ex-girlfriend Ivy. Ivy is your typical beautiful, perfect, manipulative character who is hell bent on getting what she wants. When Ivy reappears and persuades Xavier to give her another chance, Sasha knows she needs to do something to convince him Ivy is dangerous. In this media age it has become more and more easy to become tangled in somebody else’s life, and thats what Sasha does.

It’s told mostly from the first person viewpoint of Sasha and the 3rd person narrative of Xavier, however there are unnamed sections in between. There were so many times when I thought I knew what had happened, who had done it and who was talking. I changed my mind so many times and still didn’t get it right.

The pace builds slowly, like a stoking a fire, but when it really gets going it rages out of control. There’s so much to love in this book. It made me sit and think about how you can never really know who somebody is or how they’re going to act, and I thought about how we just fill in the blanks with our assumptions, and how that can go so wrong. The book touches on depression and mental health, and actually asks a lot of existential questions about how we should live our lives. It exploits a lot of moral grey areas and you have to ask: and what point would you have stopped helping your best friend? Who is in the right? Is anyone ever really innocent? There’s so much you can get out of this book.

It really made me reflect back on when I was a teenager and my relationships with my best friends. Although the way we present our relationships to the world has changed, how we feel about each other and the pressures of growing up really haven’t, and I think about this whenever someone says that YA isn’t for adults. What young adults are reading and experiencing now, people like me in their 30’s are reading and reflecting on and I don’t think there’s as much of an emotional gap as people believe.

One thing that bothered me is the prevalence of the use of drugs and alcohol. They’re 16/17 and there’s no voice saying you shouldn’t be drinking or doing drugs. I know that teenagers push the boundaries in terms of experimentation but it’s just, normal. It’s easy to see why young people get mixed messages when doctors give them drugs to help with everything then tell them they can’t use recreational drugs, or alcohol until they’re 21. But that’s another story.