The Vanishing – Sophia Tobin

51cdq2vnfvl-_sx328_bo1204203200_The Vanishing¬†is another book that I’ve been waiting to come into paperback for ages. It looks exactly up my street: Victorian era, the Gothic, moors, a wealthy family, dark secrets – what’s not to love? I had made plans to purchase it on my next trip into Birmingham but I came upon it in a local Tesco, a single copy waiting on a shelf just for me, so I snatched it up.

I settled myself down on a dreary Saturday morning and started to give myself over to Miss Annaleigh Calvert, a Foundling who grew up in London and was adopted by a Painter and his family. As her life becomes more romantically entangled she is sent to Yorkshire to work as a housekeeper for a wealthy family.

For the first hundred pages or so I found the characters really hard to connect with, and for a book that had promised me so much in the way of dark secrets and lies, there wasn’t really much going on.¬†Annaleigh is the main character and the narrative is told first person through her eyes. She’s an interesting character, though I found that I didn’t really connect with her straight away and although awful things do happen in this book, I had to force myself to care. Her upbringing as a adoptive child is quite rare in Victorian society as most children are just ‘taken in’, and it gives a good perspective of someone caught between two families, who doesn’t really fit into either.

Miss Calvert ends up in the employ of the Twentyman’s, also originally from London but retired from the city. The introduction of the looming character of Marcus Twentyman, master of the house, is probably the first time I started to feel the book turning sinister. He emanates fear and danger and at every meeting you’re really urging Annaleigh to run away from him. His sister, Hester, is probably the character I feel the most sorry for, as she is a reflection of all the women who were trapped by the ideas and morals of men.

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